The Power of TED* (*The Empowerment Dynamic)

I wanted to share with you a great book that I read recently. Written by David Emerald, The Power of TED is a book drafted in a narrative style, similar to a fable, and it tells the story of a man who has recently gone through many difficult situations in his life. He is having trouble getting out of his hopeless mentality and meets an unexpected stranger who explains to him another way to approach life and how take control of his own outcomes, regardless of circumstances.

I have outlined some of the main concepts that are explained in the book below.

The Dreaded Drama Triangle consists of three roles: Victim, Persecutor, and Rescuer

Victim: feel powerless and at the mercy of life’s events and may avoid taking responsibility for their actions, finding it easier to blame others or their circumstances

Persecutor: can be either people or conditions (such as a health condition) or a situation (such as a natural disaster) 

Rescuer: look for Victims to save and often are quick to jump in and save the day, believing others will appreciate and value them for their good deeds


‘When you inhabit any of these three roles, you’re reacting to fear of victimhood, loss of control, or loss of purpose. You’re always looking outside yourself, to the people and circumstances of life, for a sense of safety, security, and sanity.’


The TED* Triangle - TED* (*The Empowerment Dynamic) consists of three roles, Creator, Challenger, and Coach

The Creator is the central role in TED*(*The Empowerment Dynamic), which taps into an inner state of passion. Directed by intention, a Creator is focused on a desired outcome, propelling the person to take action. The role of Creator is the alternative to the drama triangle role of Victim.

A Challenger is focused on learning and growth, holding a Creator accountable while encouraging learning, action, and next steps. A Challenger consciously builds others up, as a positive alternative to putting someone down by
criticizing, blaming, or controlling. The role of Challenger is the alternative to the drama triangle role of Persecutor.

A Coach shows compassion and asks questions to help a Creator develop a vision and action plan. A Coach provides encouragement and support, in place of “rescuing” actions. The role of coach is the alternative to the drama triangle role of Rescuer.


‘Everything can be taken from a (person) but one thing: the last of the human freedoms—to choose one’s attitude in any given set of circumstances, to choose one’s own way.’


Shifts Happen by:

  • Focusing on what we want rather than what we don’t want
  • Moving from reacting to responding to life experiences
  • Reconnecting and focusing on our dreams and desired outcomes

If these concepts sounds intriguing to you, I would definitely recommend you read through the book, which explains each idea clearly and gives practical examples to illustrate how to apply it to real life. Although the ideas themselves are simple, the book has the potential to transform your life if you adopt its proposed approach when facing difficult situations.



Opposites Attract!

People often say that opposites attract. Never has this been truer than for my husband and me. I am ISTJ and he is ENFP. Total opposites in every regard.

overview of the two personality types


We have very different personalities and contrasting approaches to many facets of life. Here are a few examples:


Brain Power
I spend time thinking about upcoming appointments, weekend plans, and making lists for the grocery store. I find the topics that he spends time contemplating overly theoretical and impractical, irrelevant to our lives in the here and now. I focus on the details of everyday life, the things that are most pertinent to us in a more realistic time frame.He spends a lot of time thinking about philosophical ideologies, the existence of extraterrestrial lifeforms, social justice issues, and higher realms of consciousness. He finds it tedious to expend brain power on mundane, everyday tasks when there is so much more that the world has to offer. He focuses on the big picture, with extravagant dreams and visions for the future.
Expressing my thoughts and emotions does not come easily to me. When there is something serious that I want to talk about, I prefer to write an email, spelling out all of the points that I want to make, choosing my words carefully, and making sure I don't leave anything important out. I communicate best when I have time and space to plan my thoughts out accordingly, with no pressure to share until I’m ready. He prefers to dialogue and converse in real time. He is able to express his thoughts and emotions very well verbally. He thinks best and often has epiphanies while speaking out loud. After he reads my email, he promptly picks up the phone (if we're not in the same place), so that he can talk to me about the topic at hand. He is able to articulate himself clearly and effectively through verbal communication.
For me, after the basic, "Where are you from? What do you do?" I'm typically at a loss as to how to proceed and have to try very hard to keep the conversation going. I find small talk extremely taxing and not meaningful, and I don’t enjoy it very much. Once I am comfortable and get to know a person fairly well, I am able to relax and not put as much pressure on myself or the situation. That is when I am able to be myself and open up more. This is where my husband shines. He is charismatic, energetic, and has a genuine interest in learning about other people. He is fascinated with people who are different and similar to himself. Even when others are more reserved, he is able to ask all of the right questions to get them sharing about themselves. He is skilled at thinking on his feet and eliminating awkwardness from any situation.
For as long as I can remember, I have always been academically gifted. Doing well in school and getting good grades comes easily to me, when I willingly put in the effort. I’m a particularly fast test taker and reader, and I do well on standardized tests. I excel in areas such as math and science, but I don’t have a wide array of knowledge or interest in many different topics.My husband is very intelligent and able to grasp concepts easily. However, focus can be hard for him to attain and numbers get mixed up in his mind easily. He requires additional time to complete similar work, but he understands the concepts just as well. He has a basic knowledge of a wide array of topics, and is a self-taught expert in certain topics in which he develops a keen interest.
It can be harder for me to empathize with others on a deeper level. I tend to want to give advice to help solve the problem, rather than share in the feelings they are experiencing. I am able to remain fairly detached emotionally and maintain stability and a calm demeanor. It takes a lot for me to get extremely excited, sad, anxious, etc. He can read people effortlessly. He knows immediately when I have something on my mind that I’m not telling him. He feels other people’s feelings very deeply and is extremely affected by the energy (positive or negative) around him. He gets overwhelmed by emotions easily, through situations or by people that are in his life.
Left vs Right Brained
I think more logically and have a harder time coming up with creative ideas. Most of the time, I like to follow the traditional course of action and don’t tend to think outside of the box. I’m great at following deadlines and planning out schedules for completing projects and tasks. He is a very creative individual and needs to express himself through creative outlets, such as music. He has many different interests and not enough time to devote to all of them. He is constantly challenging the way things currently are and looking for better methods of implementation.


Being married to my opposite is both challenging and rewarding. We clash frequently because our thinking and the ways we express ourselves are so different. However, we also complement each other perfectly. I’m competent in the areas that he is not and vice versa. We also have the opportunity to learn from each other and improve in the areas in which we are lacking. The key to maintaining a happy and fulfilling marriage is communication. We have to constantly make sure we are on the same page about the things going on in our lives. Because we communicate so differently, it’s important to be intentional about making this an integral part of our daily lives. We also share a number of fundamental commonalities, such as finances, maintaining a healthy lifestyle, and our senses of humor!   


✿ Katie ✿


Helmet Head – Before & After

The original prognosis was that Elijah would have to wear a Doc band for 3-4 months, taking into consideration his age and severity of the plagiocephaly. However, it turns out that Eli is a professional at growing his head, and he was able to wear it for less than 2 months!

Here are some before and after comparison pictures to show how the helmet helped reshape his head.

As you can see, wearing the Doc band for just a few months has made significant improvement in the symmetry of his head. Although his head isn’t perfect, nobody’s is, and we are very happy that we made the decision to fix his flat spot. Not only was Eli able to wear it for a shorter period of time than expected, we also got a significant portion of the cost covered by insurance (see previous post).

At his age, his head is much less pliable, and he spends much less time on his back than in the first few months of his life. In addition, Eli has recently mastered the back to front and front to back roll and has decided that he is a tummy sleeper, so flat spots should no longer be a concern at all!


✿ Katie ✿


All About Chinese New Year

It’s almost Chinese New Year!

This year, the lunar new year falls on February 16th. 2018 is the year of the dog, according to the Chinese zodiac, which repeats every twelve years.

Even though China is beginning to incorporate more and more Western customs and holidays, Chinese New Year is still the most important celebration by far. This is a holiday centered around family – an opportunity to celebrate all of the great events of the past year, and wishing for good fortune in the year to come.


Chinese New Year is typically celebrated for fifteen days, from New Year’s Eve to the Lantern Festival.

Timeline of traditional Chinese New Year customs
Pre-New Year’s Preparations

  • Cleaning the House – A thorough cleaning of the house is done in preparation for the New Year. It represents a wish to put away old things, say farewell to the previous year, and welcome the New Year.
  • New Year Shopping – This is the time that people buy food, snacks, decorations, and clothes before New Year’s Eve. Right before Chinese New Year, like Christmas in the U.S., is prime shopping season.
  • Putting Up Spring Couplets – Spring couplets are paired phrases, typically of seven Chinese characters each, written on red paper in black ink, and pasted one each side of the door frame. The couplets are filled with best wishes, and is thought to keep evil away.
New Year’s Eve

  • Decorating – Most people decorate their houses on New Year’s Eve. Common decorations used include red lanterns, red couplets, New Year paintings, and red lanterns.
  • Reunion Dinner – The New Year’s Eve feast is the most important event, with all family members reuniting, often having to travel long distances. People from north and south China eat different foods on this special occasion, although a few symbolic dishes are usually included.
  • CCTV New Year Gala – It has become a China custom for many families to watch the CCTV New Year Gala on New Year’s Eve. The show starts at 8 pm and ends at midnight when the New Year arrives, featuring traditional, folk, and pop performances from China’s best singers, dancers, and acrobats
  • Red Envelopes – Red envelopes filled with money are usually given to kids after the reunion dinner, wishing them health, growth, and good studies in the coming year. Money in red envelopes is believed to bring good luck, as red is China’s lucky color.
  • Staying Up Late – This custom is called shǒu suì (守岁); to keep watch over the year. In the past, Chinese people stayed up all night, but now, most stay up only until the midnight firecrackers and fireworks die down.


New Year’s Day

  • Setting Off Firecrackers and Fireworks – The moment the New Year arrives, there is a cacophony of fireworks and firecrackers all around, even in rural China. You might want to use earplugs!
  • Putting on New Clothes and Extending New Year Greetings – On the first day of the New Year, it is traditional to put on new clothes, and say “gōng xǐ” (恭喜) to wish each other good luck and happiness in the New Year. It is customary for the younger generation to visit their elders, and wish them health and longevity. In more recent years, particularly among the younger generation, those who don’t have time to visit their friends or relatives send a New Year’s card, a WeChat red envelope or a text message instead.
  • Watching Lion and Dragon Dances – Lion dances and dragon dances might be seen too on New Year’s Day in parades.
New Year: Day 2-7
  • Visiting Friends and Family – This is the time people spend visiting with friends and family during the celebration.
New Year: Day 8
  • Returning to Work – 8 is the luckiest number in China, so most businesses prefer to reopen on day eight of the New Year.
New Year: Day 15

  • Lantern Festival – This marks the end of the Spring Festival celebrations. People send aloft glowing lanterns into the sky while others let floating lanterns go in the sea, on rivers, or set them adrift in lakes. This is also when tang yuan are eaten.


The Chinese commonly incorporate symbolism and homophones into their traditions and superstitious beliefs. For example, the unlucky number in China is the number 4 (四 sì) because the word is a homophone with the word death (死 sǐ). There are a number of these examples associated with Chinese New Year.


Fish is a staple on dinner tables during Chinese New Year, usually cooked whole. The word for fish (鱼 yú) is a homonym for the word surplus (余 yú), and a common sentiment spoken during this holiday is “surplus/fish year after year” (年年有余/鱼 nián nián yǒu yú). It is also tradition to have fish left over, to symbolize the surplus, especially in the head and tail (hope that the year will start and end with surplus).

Homemade dumplings and dumpling skins

Chinese dumplings are made with dough, rolled into skins, and filled with a variety of meats and vegetables. They are typically boiled, steamed, or pan fried. The shape of the dumplings resemble ingots, an ancient Chinese currency used as early as the Han dynasty. They are eaten during the New Year as a symbol of prosperity and wealth.

Try this recipe for vegan Chinese-style dumplings!

Tang Yuan

Tang yuan are made from glutinous rice flour filled with sesame or red bean paste and served in the sweet broth that they are cooked in. Traditionally, they are eaten at the end of the celebrations, during the Lantern Festival. They symbolize family reunion, as their name is a homophone for reunion, and their round shape symbolizes togetherness.

Here is a vegan-friendly recipe if you want to attempt to make these delicious sticky balls on your own. They are also be purchased frozen at Asian markets, if you want to save time and effort.

Nian Gao

The literal translation of nian gao is “year cake (年糕),” and it is used to symbolize prosperity. Gāo can also mean tall (高), so nian gao also refers to ‘getting higher year on year’, and this symbolizes raising oneself taller (in wealth) in each coming year. Follow this  recipe to make this sticky sweet treat.


The word 福fú means good fortune in Chinese. The 福 sign upside down is translated to 福倒了 fú dào le, which also sounds like 福到了fú dào le (good fortune has arrived).


✿ Katie ✿


DNA Ancestry Testing – Am I Really Chinese?

Unlike my husband’s family, who has been in the U.S. (and North Carolina) for generations, my parents were the first people (that we know of) to immigrate to the United States from our family. I like to joke with my husband that I’m a “pure blood” (lame Harry Potter reference), unlike his mixed and somewhat far removed heritage in Europe.

My husband took a DNA test through 23 and Me about two years ago to figure out where his ancestors came from. The results indicated that he is 100% Northwestern European – 62% British/Irish, 10% French/German, and 5% Scandinavian.  At the time, I didn’t feel a need to do the test because I was confident that I wouldn’t get any surprising results, but I was still curious about what I might find out.

My husband bought the kit for me for our 3 year anniversary present, and I sent my sample in. 

My results from 23 and Me are shown below, as well as the analysis of a few other websites using different databases. WeGene is based in China and specializes in DNA analysis for people of Asian descent. DNA.LAND is operated through a collaboration of scientists from the New York Genome Center and Columbia University.

It was very interesting to compare the different interpretations of my DNA. My Chinese percentage ranges from 88% to 92%, although it is difficult to compare since the definition for “Chinese” varies from site to site. For example, 23 and Me and DNA.Land does not consider Mongolian descent as Chinese, whereas WeGene does.

23 and Me believes me to be more Korean than Japanese and WeGene believes the opposite. DNA.LAND has combined the two ethnic groups into one. Overall, my Korean/Japanese ancestry seems to be somewhere in the 3-5% range.

The rest of my ancestry seemed to vary quite a bit between the three sites – Mongolian, Southeast Asian, etc. It was very interesting to see from WeGene, the breakdown of the specific ethnic groups classified under Chinese as well.

23 and Me



Although I didn’t get any crazy surprising results, it was very fascinating to see the breakdown of where my ancestors came from. Another perk of getting your DNA analysis done is that through these sites, it’s also possible to find and connect with people with whom you share DNA. I would definitely recommend getting the test done, even if you’re confident you know where your ancestors came from. You never know, you might get some surprising results!


✿ Katie ✿


Helmet Head

Back is Best

The Safe to Sleep campaign (formerly known as Back to Sleep) was launched in 1994 by the American Academy of Pediatrics, which recommended that parents put their babies to sleep on their backs in order to reduce the occurrence of SIDS (Sudden Infant Death Syndrome). This recommendation was made based on physiological evidence and lower rates of SIDS cases in other countries where this was practiced more often. Since then, the incidence of SIDS has decreased more than half!

However, babies sleeping and laying on their backs for prolonged periods of time inevitably leads to more instances of developing flat spots. This is obviously a much better trade-off than SIDS, but it is an issue than can cause problems later in life. Although no evidence has been found linking a misshapen head to brain, vision, or hearing impairment, other concerns must be taken into consideration: jaw misalignment, hat/helmet fit, wearing glasses, facial asymmetry, etc.

Flat Spot

At Elijah’s 3 month appointment, his pediatrician noticed his flat spot. It was mostly due to him always favoring one side when he slept and a slight case of torticollis (tightening of muscles in the neck which can restrict range of motion). She referred us to Cranial Technologies to get his head evaluated. I really didn’t want my son to be one of those babies who had to wear a helmet. I didn’t want him to have to endure months of discomfort (although most babies get used to it after a few days). I didn’t want to have to possibly spend thousands of dollars on the helmet. And I didn’t want people to see him wearing the helmet and assume that there was something wrong with him.

Where did this stigma come from? Why do people associate headgear on children with mental disabilities?

I did extensive research on helmet use in children. I read about studies that indicated that there was no evidence that helmets actually improved head shape. Others said that over time, especially once the baby is mobile, the baby’s head will round out naturally by 18 months of age. Our pediatrician said in order for the helmet to work the most efficiently, it should be fitted before 6 months of age. So, I put off taking him to be evaluated and took it upon myself to make sure he spent as little time on his back as possible, when awake. I also tried to reposition him when he was sleeping, on the side of his head that he did not favor.

At his 6 month appointment, his pediatrician said that the flat spot had significantly improved but that she believes he would still benefit from wearing a helmet.

As his mom, I felt like I had failed him.

We took him to get his head evaluated, holding out hope that there was still a chance that the specialists would tell us that his case was so mild that no intervention was necessary.

After his evaluation, we were told that he has a moderate case, and that he would need to wear the helmet for ~3 months. I asked if it was possible that his head shape would resolve itself over time and was told that it most likely wouldn’t get worse, but it probably wouldn’t completely fix itself. I knew that even if there was a chance, once he got old enough for us to know for sure, it would be too late to correct. We did not think that was worth the gamble.

Insurance Coverage

The next step was figuring out if insurance would cover the costs. The full price of the helmet is $4000. Cranial Technologies has a deal with our insurance company where we would only have to pay $2500 out of pocket, if it wasn’t covered. If it was covered, we would pay $250. Which price we would be paying depended solely on whether or not there was an exclusion for helmets in our insurance plan.

A few weeks later, we got the call that the helmet would NOT be covered by insurance because it was considered an aesthetic treatment. Needless to say, my husband and I were not very happy about this news. It seemed ridiculous to us that the insurance company could justify that we were putting him through this treatment just for looks.

After getting this news, I scoured the internet forums for any options we had left to get coverage for his treatment. Some people suggested appealing, while others said appeals were typically fruitless if an exclusion was spelled out in the plan. One person mentioned that the exclusions are specific to the employer’s agreement with the insurance company and that they were successful in getting coverage after contacting their HR department. I figured it was worth a try and emailed my HR representative. She forwarded the email to the Benefits group, and they said they would look into the matter and get back to me. I didn’t hear back from them after a week and figured that was a dead end. However, 3 weeks later, I received an email stating they had reviewed the case and will make an exception and cover the treatment. The insurance company paid $3600 of the $4000 total, which was a huge help.

If your insurance is denying you coverage, contact your employer’s HR department and see if they can make an exception!


At his 3 week checkup, they saw a lot of progress on head growth. He’s been working hard growing that noggin and he may be able to get it taken off sooner than expected. They say that he will only need to wear it another 4-6 weeks!


✿ Katie ✿


Fiction Kitchen – Raleigh, NC

Walking past Fiction Kitchen in downtown Raleigh, the first thing you’ll notice is the bright green paint and the large yellow sign. Peering in for a closer look, you will see the mismatched furniture, quirky decor, and laid back feeling of the restaurant. Although the atmosphere is casual, the taste and look of the food is on par with many fine dining restaurants. Fiction Kitchen caters specifically to both vegan and gluten-free customers, offering a variety of American and ethnic dishes. This is the place that I would take a meat-lover friend who is convinced that all vegan food is bland and tasteless.

My husband and I came to Fiction Kitchen for the first time with his family around Thanksgiving. We had heard great things about the place and expectations were set high. It was such a nice change to be able to walk into a restaurant and be able to pick anything on the menu. We have become accustomed to having to choose from 1 or 2 vegan-customizable dishes (at best!) when eating out with non-vegan family and friends.

To start off, we ordered the cornmeal-fried oyster mushrooms and root vegetable fries. The fried mushrooms were reminiscent of fried calamari, with a less rubbery texture. It was incredibly well-seasoned and the crispy cornmeal texture offset the mushrooms perfectly. The fries were also a winner; well seasoned and cooked and served with two great dipping sauces (dill aioli & chipotle “buttermilk” dressing).

I ordered Nori Rolls with Sashimi Tofu for my entree. The ingredients in the sushi rolls were were so unique and not things I would have guessed would taste good in sushi. But the combination of textures and flavors were amazing. The microgreens salad was well dressed and complemented the dish well. But the standout component of the dish was the seared tofu. It had a soft and porous texture, was slightly sweet and savory, and had a coating of sesame seeds. Although it did not resemble sashimi in taste or texture, I was not at all disappointed by the substitution. My husband kept trying to steal my tofu and sushi rolls when I wasn’t looking.

Nori wrapped local butter bean hummus, quinoa, carrot, cucumber, radish and spicy microgreens, finished with a sorghum molasses + dijon emulsion. Served with a kale sesame salad, seared sashimi tofu, house pickled ginger and wasabi

My husband ordered the Curry Bowl. It had a great variety of different vegetables, and the the curry was spicy and tasty. My only complaint was that the curry didn’t seem to penetrate the vegetables, so they weren’t as saturated with the curry flavor as I had hoped. My husband also mentioned that the rice (not pictured) was unusually salty. The concept of the dish was great, but the execution didn’t quite hit the mark.

Housemade yellow curry, coconut milk and seasoned vegetables prepared on a spice level from 1 through 5, served with jasmine rice on the side 

To end the meal, we ordered a slice of a dark chocolate ganache pie. The texture was smooth and creamy and the crunchy pretzel crust was a great base. The salted caramel drizzle tied the whole thing together nicely. My husband’s sister liked it so much that she wanted to buy a whole one to take home, but we were told that required advance notice.

Dark Chocolate Ganache Pie with Pretzel Crust and Salted Caramel

Our experience at Fiction Kitchen lived up to all of the hype, and we are DEFINITELY coming back again soon.

It’s almost too good to be vegan!


✿ Katie ✿


Evolution of Chinese Food in America

There are over 45,000 Chinese restaurants in the U.S. That’s more than McDonald’s, Burger King, and KFC combined. The majority of these restaurants offer very similar looking and tasting food, even though these restaurants are independently owned and operated.

I grew up in a household where my mother only cooked Chinese food. However, most of these dishes were nothing like the most popular dishes ordered at Chinese takeout restaurants. As Jennifer Lee explains in The Fortune Cookie Chronicles,

“As a child, I never considered it strange that the food we ordered from Chinese restaurants didn’t quite resemble my mom’s home cooking. My mom used white rice, soy sauce, garlic, scallions, and a wok. But she never deep-fried chunks of meat, succulent and soft, then drenched them with rich, flavorful sauce. She cooked with ingredients that were pickled and dried and of strange shapes and never appeared on the takeout menu.”

The assimilation of Chinese immigrants into American culture is not exactly a happy story. It’s also a story that not many people are familiar with.

In the 19th century, the people in China faced an onslaught of hardships, including natural disasters, war, overpopulation, and the financial burdens brought on by Western Imperialism. When the news of gold in California reached China, the decision to travel halfway around the world was even more enticing. After the Chinese people arrived in San Francisco, Americans did not know what to make of them. They wore long braids, spoke a strange language, ate foods Westerners had never encountered, and had terrible table manners (they eat with sticks!). Chinese cuisine comprised of many animals that Americans deemed repulsive, and an image of a rat-eating Chinese man was featured in school textbooks in the late 1800s. Advertisements also used anti-Chinese sentiments as a means to sell their products.

As more Chinese people arrived looking for work, the negative perceptions of them increased. This led to countless lynchings, shootings, and arson, targeted at the ethnic group. The Chinese Exclusion Act was passed in 1882, which restricted Chinese immigration and prevented Chinese arrivals from becoming naturalized citizens. This is the only law passed in American history to exclude a group by race or ethnicity. As the doors were closed to Chinese immigration, and jobs in agriculture, mining, and manufacturing were taken back by the Americans, the Chinese already living in America had to find an alternative way to make a living. Their solution was opening up laundries and restaurants. The number of Chinese-owned restaurants and laundries flourished in the late 1800s, particularly on the west coast. Because cleaning and cooking were both considered women’s work,  American laborers did not feel threatened.

In the Chinese restaurants, the food served was not the same food that Chinese people ate themselves. They served food that was exotic but not scary. The most well-known dish was chop suey, which consists of meat, a thick sauce, and Asian vegetables (bean sprouts, water chestnuts, celery, cabbage). Many Americans believed this was a signature Chinese dish, but it was invented and served exclusively overseas. The name of the dish translates literally to “odds and ends” in Cantonese. There are a few theories about how the dish came about but no documented proof. Although the dish is becoming lesser known over time, being replaced by other Americanized Chinese dishes such as General Tso’s chicken, it paved the way and popularized American-friendly Chinese food.

Chop Suey

Due to the Chinese Exclusion Act (1882-1943), immigration from China was non-existent and the chop suey phase lasted for many decades. The borders finally reopened in 1943, but laws didn’t become more lenient until 1965. New styles of Chinese cuisine were introduced – Szechuan and Hunan. People living in these two regions of China typically enjoy dishes that are flavorful and very spicy. However, the people who were cooking these types of food were mostly from Taiwan and Hong Kong, known for their lighter and sweeter dishes. So the end result was a mashup of Taiwanese food, with inspiration from Szechuan and Hunan, using ingredients familiar to American palates that often didn’t exist in China. That is how the deep fried, sweet and spicy dishes we know and love originally found its way onto Chinese menus. None of these dishes were “authentic,” but new immigrants opening Chinese restaurants copied what seemed to be working and these similar tasting dishes with the same names materialized all over the United States.

In the early 2000s, other Asian ethnicities (Thai, Japanese, Korean, Vietnamese) with more “authentic” menus flooded urban cities, giving adventurous eaters some alternatives to the well-loved Americanized Chinese food. In recent years, first and second generation Chinese-Americans have embraced their roots and opened up restaurants featuring true Chinese cuisine, such as hand pulled noodles, steamed buns, and whole fish. Fusion cuisine has also taken off, combining both Asian and European styles to create an entirely new category of dishes.

How Chinese food will evolve from this point on, no one knows. The possibilities are endless!


✿ Katie ✿


Sleep Training

After you bring your new baby home, sleep becomes one of life’s most precious commodities. When the baby doesn’t sleep, one or both parents also don’t sleep. Some babies are naturally great sleepers while others require hours of bouncing, rocking, and soothing, just for a short nap. To make things even harder, there are so many precautions and recommendations about safe sleep for babies.

SIDS danger. Back is best. No loose blankets. No stuffed animals. Nothing in the crib. Flat, firm surface only. Sleep in the same room until 6 months. Don’t co-sleep. Avoid sleeping in car seats, swings, bouncers, etc. Make sure the baby is not overheated.

This can be extremely overwhelming, particularly when a desperate and exhausted parent is trying to get the baby to sleep by any means necessary.

‘The baby will only fall asleep in the swing. Does this make me a bad parent?’

In the first three months, you’re in pure survival mode. Don’t worry about bad habits, spoiling the baby, or holding the baby too much. Do whatever needs to be done to keep the baby thriving and happy. But after the baby gets to be 4-6 months old and is still waking up 6 times a night, the idea of sleep training starts to get tossed around.

What is sleep training?

It refers to helping a baby learn how to fall asleep and stay asleep throughout the night without assistance. This is done by taking away sleeping aids (rocking, patting, shushing, feeding, pacifier) that the baby depends on to fall asleep and letting the baby fall asleep on his/her own by learning to self-soothe. The belief is that if the baby is used to having these aids to fall asleep and wakes up in the middle of the night without them, falling asleep again will be much harder to do. Successful sleep training would ideally result in better rest and less stress for both the baby and the parents.


Critics claim that allowing the baby to be in distress for prolonged periods of time could be detrimental to development and cause learned helplessness. However, there is not yet any evidence that support these claims. A study that examined the differences in children who had and had not been sleep trained five years earlier found no significant differences in traits such as sleep problems, behavioral problems, mental health, and attachment issues.

Studies do show that sleep deprivation has long-term negative consequences and can lead to depression-like symptoms and attention issues. This would not only affect the health of the parents but also their ability to care for their child effectively. Sleep deprivation of the baby also affects the baby’s mood and can inhibit attention and learning.

Sleep Training Methods

It is agreed upon across the board that newborns should NOT be sleep trained. They have not yet developed the ability to self-soothe and cannot form good sleeping habits at that age. Four to six months is the most common age range that sleep training experts believe a baby to be ready for sleep training. There are a wide range of methods that are commonly utilized. The five most well-known methods are listed below:

  • No Cry Sleep Solution – Uses gentle techniques such as fading (using a preferred sleep association less and less each night) or substitution (substitute a sleep association with a different sleep association; easier to eliminate since it is not as preferred by the baby)
  • Sleep Lady Shuffle (Gradual Withdrawal) – Sit in a chair next to the crib and verbally soothe and shush baby. Move the chair further away from the crib every night until you are out of the room.
  • Pick Up Put Down (PUPD) – Put baby to bed awake and check on baby at graduated intervals (i.e. 3, 5, 7 minutes) if baby is still crying hard. Pick up baby to soothe and then put down.
  • Graduated Extinction (Ferber) – Put baby to bed awake and check on baby at graduated intervals (i.e. 3, 5, 7 minutes) if baby is still crying hard. Verbally soothe or pat baby to comfort.
  • Weissbluth (Cry It Out, Full Extinction) – After the bedtime routine, put the baby in the room and do not return until the next morning (except for feedings).

Elijah’s Sleep Training Story

We decided to start sleep training Elijah when he was around four and a half months old. He has never been a terrible sleeper but was constantly waking up three to four times a night, and it was really taking a toll on my sleep. His primary soothing mechanisms were feeding and the pacifier, so the goal was to eliminate both of these sleep associations. For the bedtime routine, he had a bottle before bath time, in order to separate any feeding associations. Because he was still relatively young, I did not cut out night feeds entirely, but I did not feed him until it had been at least four hours since the last feeding to make sure that he was actually hungry and not looking to eat for comfort. I also took away the pacifier at night time. 

My original intention was to use the Ferber Graduated Extinction method for sleep training. I purchased and read the book, “Solve Your Child’s Sleep Problems,” in order to prepare. Once we began training, however, I quickly realized that checks at intervals did not soothe Elijah but rather prolonged his distress. So I stopped going in, and I watched him on the baby monitor to make sure he was okay. The first night was the longest stretch of crying (~25 minutes) before falling asleep. He also woke up a few times during the night and cried around 10-15 minutes each time. He adjusted quickly and after a few days, there was no crying at all at bedtime before he fell asleep – just some grumbling. It also helps that he’s not a crier by nature, so I can typically tell when he’s just fussing and when he actually needs something.

Just because a baby is “trained” does not mean they will be a good sleeper from that point on. Regressions can happen when the baby is sick, teething, or for seemingly no reason at all. He does still have nights where he wakes up more often, but this is not the norm. I try to stay consistent with my techniques, and he typically goes back to his normal sleep patterns after a day or two.

Final Tips

A baby’s personality is very important to consider when deciding whether or not to sleep train. Only you know your baby best and whether or not he/she is ready for sleep training and what method will work the best. Some babies respond to training faster than others and methods can be adjusted accordingly.

Sleep training is not necessarily a requirement to foster good sleeping habits. Some babies are able to develop good sleeping habits naturally over time, but in other cases, bad sleep habits are carried into toddler-hood, preschool, and beyond, when bad habits become much harder to change.

Sleep training is not for everyone, but it did work for us.


✿ Katie ✿

Featured image by Alison Wong of New Mom Comics


Beyond Meat: The Beyond Burger

Introducing: a brand new series, called Too Good to be Vegan!

A lot of omnivores automatically assume vegan friendly foods means bland, sub par dishes that consist mostly of salads and tofu. This is absolutely not true. Not to mention, salads and tofu can be very tasty when prepared well!

In this series, I will be telling you about delicious vegan food that even non-vegans would be happy to eat. The foods featured will include both restaurant entrees and meals prepared at home, snacks, desserts, and anything else that is 100% vegan and delicious!

My husband and I recently found out about The Beyond Burger, made by the brand Beyond Meat. This burger is made out of 100% plant protein (pea protein for their “beef” burgers) but mimics the texture and taste of meat and even “bleeds” like a real burger.

I’ve had my fair share of veggie burgers, and though some of them are indeed tasty and well seasoned, none of them have really resembled the texture or taste of meat. I definitely had my doubts about how close this purely vegan burger could come to the “real thing.”

The burger looks so convincing, it’s even found in the meat section of some grocery stores

I was surprised at how much the burger looked like meat, even when raw. It had the same coloration and texture, although it was slightly softer. Nevertheless, it held up nicely on the grill.

I was extremely impressed with the taste and texture of The Beyond Burger. It wasn’t starchy or crumbly, like veggie burgers I’ve tasted in the past. It also had a hint of smokiness that pushed the meatiness factor even further.

Although a vegan diet should consist mostly of whole fruits and vegetables, a good processed substitute can be a fun treat. In terms of nutrition, this burger is similar to an actual beef burger, with 22 grams of fat and 5 grams of saturated fat. No wonder it tastes so good! However, the main difference is that these burgers have 100% less beef.


Ingredients: pea protein isolate, expeller-pressed canola oil, refined coconut oil, water, yeast extract, maltodextrin, natural flavors, gum arabic, sunflower oil, salt, succinic acid, acetic acid, non-GMO modified food starch, cellulose from bamboo, methylcellulose, potato starch, beet juice extract (for color), ascorbic acid (to maintain color), annatto extract (for color), citrus fruit extract (to maintain quality), vegetable glycerin.

Where Can I Buy It?

Whole Foods, Wegmans, Kroger, Ralphs, QFC, Fred Meyer, King Soopers, Dillons, Safeway, Albertsons, and more!


This burger definitely hits the spot when you’re craving the good ol’ American classic. It’s almost too good to be vegan!


✿ Katie ✿